skip to primary navigation skip to content
 

Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics (HCEP)

Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics (HCEP)

Research on Histories, Cultures, Environments and Politics (HCEP) includes areas such as:

  • Cosmologies and knowledge systems
  • Models of polar governance and geopolitics
  • Cryopolitics: the social and ecological dynamics of the global cryosphere.
  • Temporality and spatiality: constructions of region and territory in the polar regions
  • Inuit historiography, orality, traditional knowledge.
  • Visual narratives and the circulation of knowledge
  • Scientific practice and knowledge production.

Research projects

Research projects currently being undertaken include:

Arctic Cultures - Sites of collection in the formation of the European and American Northlands

Arctic Cultures - Sites of collection in the formation of the European and American Northlands

ARCTIC CULT investigates the construction of the Arctic that emerged from the exploration of the region by Europeans and North Americans and their contacts with indigenous people from the middle of the sixteenth century. During the exploration and colonisation of the Arctic, particular texts, cartographic representations and objects were collected and returned to sites like London, Copenhagen, Berlin and Philadelphia. The construction of the Arctic thereby became entwined with the growth of colonial museum cultures and, indeed, western modernity.

Instruments of scientific governance? Historical geographies of Halley Bay, 1956 - present

Instruments of scientific governance? Historical geographies of Halley Bay, 1956 - present

This project examines the emergence of scientific governance in Antarctica by focusing on the Halley Bay research station. Halley Bay was established by the Royal Society in 1956 in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, 1957-58. The scientific station operated continually until 2017, when overwintering became too dangerous due to a growing crack in the Brunt Ice Shelf. The station has become a critical centre for global science, including the discovery of the ozone hole in the 1980s.

ORHELIA: 'Oral History of Empires by Elders in the Arctic'

ORHELIA: 'Oral History of Empires by Elders in the Arctic'

The Orhelia project develops a comparative history of relations between remote people and states in the eyes of Arctic indigenous elders, by using the method of life history analysis and oral history fieldwork combined with anthropological participant observation. Doing so, the project will also contribute to preserve incorporeal cultural heritage among Uralic speaking northern minorities of Europe and study the transmission of historical heritage between different generations.

Earlier projects:

Staff and students

The following scientists at the Scott Polar Research Institute are involved in this area of research:

Senior Academic Staff
Researchers
Research students
Associates

Previous workshops