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Scott's Last Expedition

Saturday, March 25th 1911

We have had two days of surprisingly warm weather, the sky overcast, snow falling, wind only in light airs. Last night the sky was clearing, with a southerly wind, and this morning the sea was open all about us. It is disappointing to find the ice so reluctant to hold; at the same time one supposes that the cooling of the water is proceeding and therefore that each day makes it easier for the ice to form – the sun seems to have lost all power, but I imagine its rays still tend to warm the surface water about the noon hours. It is only a week now to the date which I thought would see us all at Cape Evans.

The warmth of the air has produced a comparatively uncomfortable state of affairs in the hut. The ice on the inner roof is melting fast, dripping on the floor and streaming down the sides. The increasing cold is checking the evil even as I write. Comfort could only be ensured in the hut either by making a clean sweep of all the ceiling ice or by keeping the interior at a critical temperature little above freezing-point.

Nelson and Day’s Bunks, in the Winterquarters Hut
“Nelson and Day’s Bunks, in the Winterquarters Hut”

Nelson and Day’s Bunks, in the Winterquarters Hut
“Nelson and Day’s Bunks, in the Winterquarters Hut”

Interior of Mr Pontings Darkroom (showing his Bed) in the Winterquarters Hut.
“Interior of Mr Pontings Darkroom (showing his Bed) in the Winterquarters Hut.”

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