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Scott's Last Expedition

Monday, February 13th 1911

No. 12 Camp. 9 miles 150 yds. The wind got up from the south with drift before we started yesterday – all appearance of a blizzard. But we got away at 12.30 and marched through drift for 7 miles. It was exceedingly cold at first. Just at starting the sky cleared in the wonderfully rapid fashion usual in these regions. We saw that our camp had the southern edge of the base rock of the Bluff in line with Mt. Discovery, and White Island well clear of the eastern slope of Mt. Erebus. A fairly easy alignment to pick up.

At lunch time the sky lightened up and the drift temporarily ceased. I thought we were going to get in a good march, but on starting again the drift came thicker than ever and soon the course grew wild. We went on for 2 miles and then I decided to camp. So here we are with a full blizzard blowing. I told Wilson I should camp if it grew thick, and hope he and Meares have stopped where they were. They saw Evans start back from No. 11 Camp before leaving. I trust they have got in something of a march before stopping. This continuous bad weather is exceedingly trying, but our own ponies are quite comfortable this time, I’m glad to say. We have built them extensive snow walls behind which they seem to get quite comfortable shelter. We are five in a tent yet fairly comfortable.

Our ponies’ coats are certainly getting thicker and I see no reason why we shouldn’t get to the 80th parallel if only the weather would give us a chance.

Bowers is wonderful. Throughout the night he has worn no head-gear but a common green felt hat kept on with a chin stay and affording no cover whatever for the ears. His face and ears remain bright red. The rest of us were glad to have thick Balaclavas and wind helmets. I have never seen anyone so unaffected by the cold. To-night he remained outside a full hour after the rest of us had got into the tent. He was simply pottering about the camp doing small jobs to the sledges, &c. Cherry-Garrard is remarkable because of his eyes. He can only see through glasses and has to wrestle with all sorts of inconveniences in consequence. Yet one could never guess it – for he manages somehow to do more than his share of the work.

A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.
“A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.”

A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.
“A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.”

A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.
“A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.”

A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.
“A corner of the Penguinry at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.”

Penguins, and a berg at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.
“Penguins, and a berg at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.”

Penguins, and a berg at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.
“Penguins, and a berg at Cape Royds. Feb. 13th 1911.”

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