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Scott's Last Expedition

Wednesday, January 4th 1911 4am

The steep exposed hill sides on the west side of Cape Bird look like high cliffs as one gets south of them and form a most conspicuous land mark. We pushed past these cliffs into streams of heavy bay ice, making fair progress; as we proceeded the lanes became scarcer, the floes heavier, but the latter remain loose. ‘Many of us spent the night on deck as we pushed through the pack.’ We have passed some very large floes evidently frozen in the strait. This is curious, as all previous evidence has pointed to the clearance of ice sheets north of Cape Royds early in the spring.

I have observed several floes with an entirely new type of surface. They are covered with scales, each scale consisting of a number of little flaky ice sheets superimposed, and all ‘dipping’ at the same angle. It suggests to me a surface with sastrugi and layers of fine dust on which the snow has taken hold.

We are within 5 miles of Cape Royds and ought to get there.

Erebus at 1.15 a.m. Jan. 4th 1911.
“Erebus at 1.15 a.m. Jan. 4th 1911.”

Erebus at 1.15 a.m. Jan. 4th 1911.
“Erebus at 1.15 a.m. Jan. 4th 1911.”

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