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Museum catalogue: Antarctic Collection

 

Flag

Image
Accession no.: N: 1038
Object name: Flag
Title: Flag
Description: A black flag from the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition 1910-12 (Fram) found near the South Pole and brought back by Dr Edward Adrian Wilson on the British Antarctic Expedition 1910-13 (Terra Nova).
Classified name:
SPRI theme flags
Current place name Antarctic regions > South Pole
UDC 727.7
Geographic UDC (*701)
Getty AAT flags
Field collection:
Person Wilson, Edward Adrian
Date 18/1/1912
Place Antarctic regions > South Pole
Number of items: 1
Full description:

An almost square flag made of black textile, probably wool, in plain weave. The short sides are both selvedges and the long sides are frayed, suggesting the flag has been cut from a longer piece of fabric, and hemmed. Along the top edge, the hem has doubled back on itself for approximately 5cm to reinforce the top left corner where the flag would be attached to a post. In this case, the flag was attached to an old sledge runner using string, which is crudely attached to one short side of the flag by threading through the textile. The two ends of this string were originally looped and tied around the sledge runner, but the loop has been cut, leaving four loose ends and a large knot. Below this loop there is a second piece of the same string which is also doubled over and threaded through the textile about 4cm below the top string. The second string is tied to the textile and then the double ends stitched down part of the short edge. There is a length of brown coarse sewing thread tied to the top corner of the flag at one end and tied to the knot on the top string at the other end. A small section of the same thread is tied to the lower corner of the flag as well. It is not clear if this original or from an early museum display.

Dimensions:
  • Width: 570mm, height: 490mm
Associated expedition(s):
  • Used on: Norwegian Antarctic Expedition 1910-12 (Fram) (1910 - 1912)