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Record #199091:

Temporal variability of diapycnal mixing in Shag Rocks Passage / Gillian M. Damerell.

Title: Temporal variability of diapycnal mixing in Shag Rocks Passage / Gillian M. Damerell.
Author(s): Damerell, Gillian M.
Date: 2012.
In: Journal of Physical Oceanography. (2012.), Vol. 42(3) (2012)
Abstract: Describes method for calculating diapycnal diffusivity (Kz) from moored acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity shear profiles moored at 2,400 m depth, 600 m above seafloor in Shag Rocks Passage in North Scotia Ridge, Atlantic sector of Southern Ocean, and produces section of Kz along North Scotia Ridge to set spatial context for moored time series. Discusses modification to method for use with mooring data and time series thus obtained. Uses spectral analysis to identify significant periodicities, and identifies potential sources of temporal variability in Kz. No significant signal at annual or semiannual periods was found, but there was evidence of signals at periods of approximately 14 days (likely due to spring/neap tide cycle) and at periods of 3.8 and 2.6 days, most likely due to topographically trapped waves propagating around local seamount. This was confirmed using model of baroclinic topographically trapped waves. Diffusivity is anticorrelated with rotary coefficient (indicating that stronger mixing occurs during times of upward energy propagation), which suggests that mixing occurs due to breaking of internal waves generated at topography.
Notes:

Journal of Physical Oceanography. Vol. 42(3) :370-385 (2012).

Keywords: 551.46 -- Oceanography, physical.
551.462 -- Submarine topography, bottom forms.
551.462.62 -- Submarine ridges and rises.
551.465 -- Oceanography, dynamics.
551.465.5 -- Ocean currents.
551.466 -- Waves and tides, marine.
91(08) -- Expeditions: 1962- British Antarctic Survey.
91(08) -- Expeditions: 2003-04 BAS.
.000(410) -- British author.
C -- Oceanography, hydrography and hydrology.
(*7) -- Antarctic regions.
(*80) -- Southern Ocean.
(*82) -- South Atlantic Ocean.
(*824) -- Scotia Sea.
SPRI record no.: 199091

MARCXML

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100 1# ‡aDamerell, Gillian M.
245 10 ‡aTemporal variability of diapycnal mixing in Shag Rocks Passage /‡cGillian M. Damerell.
260 ## ‡a[S.l.] :‡b[s.n.],‡c2012.
300 ## ‡ap. 370-385 :‡bill., diags., tables, maps.
500 ## ‡aJournal of Physical Oceanography. Vol. 42(3) :370-385 (2012).
520 3# ‡aDescribes method for calculating diapycnal diffusivity (Kz) from moored acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity shear profiles moored at 2,400 m depth, 600 m above seafloor in Shag Rocks Passage in North Scotia Ridge, Atlantic sector of Southern Ocean, and produces section of Kz along North Scotia Ridge to set spatial context for moored time series. Discusses modification to method for use with mooring data and time series thus obtained. Uses spectral analysis to identify significant periodicities, and identifies potential sources of temporal variability in Kz. No significant signal at annual or semiannual periods was found, but there was evidence of signals at periods of approximately 14 days (likely due to spring/neap tide cycle) and at periods of 3.8 and 2.6 days, most likely due to topographically trapped waves propagating around local seamount. This was confirmed using model of baroclinic topographically trapped waves. Diffusivity is anticorrelated with rotary coefficient (indicating that stronger mixing occurs during times of upward energy propagation), which suggests that mixing occurs due to breaking of internal waves generated at topography.
530 ## ‡aAlso issued online ‡uurn:doi:10.1175/2011JPO4573.1‡uhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2011JPO4573.1
650 07 ‡a551.46 -- Oceanography, physical.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a551.462 -- Submarine topography, bottom forms.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a551.462.62 -- Submarine ridges and rises.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a551.465 -- Oceanography, dynamics.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a551.465.5 -- Ocean currents.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a551.466 -- Waves and tides, marine.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a91(08) -- Expeditions: 1962- British Antarctic Survey.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a91(08) -- Expeditions: 2003-04 BAS.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a.000(410) -- British author.‡2udc
650 07 ‡aC -- Oceanography, hydrography and hydrology.‡2local
651 #7 ‡a(*7) -- Antarctic regions.‡2udc
651 #7 ‡a(*80) -- Southern Ocean.‡2udc
651 #7 ‡a(*82) -- South Atlantic Ocean.‡2udc
651 #7 ‡a(*824) -- Scotia Sea.‡2udc
773 0# ‡7nnas ‡tJournal of Physical Oceanography. ‡gVol. 42(3) (2012) ‡wSPRI-78712
916 ## ‡a2012/05/18 -- HS
917 ## ‡aUnenhanced record from Muscat, imported 2019
948 3# ‡a20221208 ‡bHS