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Record #191809:

TB outbreak winding down / Peter Varga.

Title: TB outbreak winding down / Peter Varga.
Author(s): Varga, Peter.
Date: 2010.
In: News/North. (2010.), Vol. 65(18) (2010)
Abstract: Reports that tuberculosis outbreak in Deline appears to be ending, as officials have succeeded in screening 95% of residents for disease. Notes that incidence of tuberculosis in Canadian North is about seven times national average, and that disease has been highly prevalent since its introduction in 1930s. Lack of historical exposure, and factors such as overcrowding, housing, nutrition, smoking and substance abuse are all thought to be causes of disease's high incidence.
Notes:

News/North. Vol. 65(18) :19 (2010).

Keywords: 614 -- Public health and safety.
616-002.5 -- Tuberculosis.
I -- Medicine and health.
(*3) -- Arctic regions.
(*41) -- Canada.
(*440) -- Northwest Territories.
SPRI record no.: 191809

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100 1# ‡aVarga, Peter.
245 10 ‡aTB outbreak winding down /‡cPeter Varga.
260 ## ‡a[S.l.] :‡b[s.n.],‡c2010.
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500 ## ‡aNews/North. Vol. 65(18) :19 (2010).
520 3# ‡aReports that tuberculosis outbreak in Deline appears to be ending, as officials have succeeded in screening 95% of residents for disease. Notes that incidence of tuberculosis in Canadian North is about seven times national average, and that disease has been highly prevalent since its introduction in 1930s. Lack of historical exposure, and factors such as overcrowding, housing, nutrition, smoking and substance abuse are all thought to be causes of disease's high incidence.
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651 #7 ‡a(*440) -- Northwest Territories.‡2udc
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916 ## ‡a2010/09/10 -- JW
917 ## ‡aUnenhanced record from Muscat, imported 2019
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