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Record #191039:

The historical roots of a frontier alcohol culture: Alaska and northern Canada / Mary Ehrlander.

Title: The historical roots of a frontier alcohol culture: Alaska and northern Canada / Mary Ehrlander.
Author(s): Ehrlander, Mary.
Date: 2010.
In: Northern Review. (2010.), Vol. 32 (2010)
Abstract: Describes historical spread of alcohol abuse from frontiersmen, traders, military personnel, whalers, miners and construction workers to indigenous peoples in North American Arctic. Influenced by newcomers (and perhaps owing to tradition of feasting during times of plenty) indigenous peoples adopted binge or spree style of drinking soon after exposure. Colonial authorities and later national governments regulated trade in alcohol, but prohibitions were unevenly applied and widely flouted. Between 1950s and 1970s, alcohol abuse and related harms, which had been limited and/or intermittent, became pervasive, owing to regular access to alcohol coinciding with economic development, settlement, and government provision of social services and transfer payments.
Notes:

Northern Review. Vol. 32 :63-103 (2010).

Keywords: 3 -- Social sciences.
323.1 -- National and ethnic minorities.
364.122/.124 -- Social change and associated problems.
613/614(091) -- Medicine, history of.
613.81 -- Alcoholism.
614 -- Public health and safety.
663 -- Beverages, stimulants and narcotics.
663.5 -- Alcoholic beverages.
93"18" -- Nineteenth century.
93"19" -- Twentieth century.
93"20" -- Twenty-first century.
V -- History.
(*3) -- Arctic regions.
(*41) -- Canada.
(*49) -- Alaska.
SPRI record no.: 191039

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650 07 ‡a93"20" -- Twenty-first century.‡2udc
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