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Record #177154:

How far west can Eskimo languages be traced? / Michael Fortescue.

Title: How far west can Eskimo languages be traced? / Michael Fortescue.
Author(s): Fortescue, Michael.
Date: 2005.
Publisher: 2005: Kobenhavns Universitet
In: Tjukotka i fortid og nutid. (2005.),
Abstract: Discusses surprising assertion made by Julius Klaproth in Asia Polyglotta (1823) that there were groups of Eskimo speakers in coastal region of Chukotka and also at mouth of Anadyr river. This contradicts generally held belief that Naukanski is most recent Eskimo language to have arrived in Chukotka from Alaska and Sirenikski is on extreme periphery of family. Analyses word lists found in Klaproth's work and discusses contradictions with other sources. Concludes that misunderstandings arose for variety of reasons.
Notes:

In: Tjukotka i fortid og nutid / Bent Nielsen, ed.

Keywords: 39 -- Ethnography: Eskimosy.
93 -- History.
802/809 -- Languages, specific.
809.475 -- Eskimo-Aleut languages.
S -- Literature and Language.
(*501) -- Russia (Federation).
(*531.251) -- Chukotskiy Avtonomnyy Okrug.
SPRI record no.: 177154

MARCXML

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100 1# ‡aFortescue, Michael.
245 10 ‡aHow far west can Eskimo languages be traced? /‡cMichael Fortescue.
260 ## ‡a2005 :‡bKobenhavns Universitet,‡c2005.
300 ## ‡ap. 65-90 :‡bill., tables, map.
500 ## ‡aIn: Tjukotka i fortid og nutid / Bent Nielsen, ed.
520 3# ‡aDiscusses surprising assertion made by Julius Klaproth in Asia Polyglotta (1823) that there were groups of Eskimo speakers in coastal region of Chukotka and also at mouth of Anadyr river. This contradicts generally held belief that Naukanski is most recent Eskimo language to have arrived in Chukotka from Alaska and Sirenikski is on extreme periphery of family. Analyses word lists found in Klaproth's work and discusses contradictions with other sources. Concludes that misunderstandings arose for variety of reasons.
650 07 ‡a39 -- Ethnography: Eskimosy.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a93 -- History.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a802/809 -- Languages, specific.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a809.475 -- Eskimo-Aleut languages.‡2udc
650 07 ‡aS -- Literature and Language.‡2local
651 #7 ‡a(*501) -- Russia (Federation).‡2udc
651 #7 ‡a(*531.251) -- Chukotskiy Avtonomnyy Okrug.‡2udc
773 0# ‡7nnam ‡aBent Nielsen, ed. ‡tTjukotka i fortid og nutid. ‡d2005 : Kobenhavns Universitet, 2005. ‡wSPRI-173675
916 ## ‡a2006/11/08 -- IW
917 ## ‡aUnenhanced record from Muscat, imported 2019
948 3# ‡a20220929 ‡bIW