skip to primary navigation skip to content
 

 

You are not currently logged in

SPRI library catalogue

View a record

Please note: You are viewing the legacy database of the Scott Polar Research Institute Library catalogue. It is no longer being updated, so does not reliably reflect our current library holdings.

Please search for material in iDiscover for up-to-date information about the library collection.


Record #172604:

Corticosterone alone does not trigger a short term behavioural shift in incubating female common eiders Somateria mollissima, but does modify long term reproductive success / François Criscuolo, and 6 others.

Title: Corticosterone alone does not trigger a short term behavioural shift in incubating female common eiders Somateria mollissima, but does modify long term reproductive success / François Criscuolo, and 6 others.
Author(s): Criscuolo, François.
Date: 2005.
In: Journal of Avian Biology. (2005.), Vol. 36(4) (2005)
Abstract: Corticosterone and prolactin affect reproductive success by stimulating foraging and parental behaviours, respectively. Study tested effect of corticosterone implants on reproductive success and plasma prolactin concentration in female common eiders Somateria mollissima in Prins Heinrich Island colony, Kongsfjorden, Svalbard in June 2001. Implanted females showed significant increase in corticosterone and decrease in prolactin levels. Despite enhanced daily body mass loss, females did not abandon incubation nor start to refeed in the four days following implantation. Data show experimentally induced rise in plasma corticosterone concentration alone does not trigger nest desertion. Suggests that prolactin decrease, or depletion of protein body reserves, may be factor in long-term adjustment of incubation behaviour in female eiders.
Notes:

Journal of Avian Biology. Vol. 36(4) :306-312 (2005).

Keywords: 59 -- Zoology.
591.131.1 -- Animal feeding behaviour.
591.551 -- Animals, breeding behaviour.
591.568 -- Care and feeding of young animals.
598.2 -- Birds.
598.412 -- Anseres: Somateria mollissima.
H5 -- Zoology: birds.
(*3) -- Arctic regions.
(*32) -- Svalbard.
SPRI record no.: 172604

MARCXML

LDR 01923naa#a2200000#a#4500
001 SPRI-172604
005 20220926081027.0
007 ta
008 220926s2005####xx####|##|###|0||#0|eng#d
035 ## ‡aSPRI-172604
040 ## ‡aUkCU-P‡beng‡eaacr
100 1# ‡aCriscuolo, François.
245 10 ‡aCorticosterone alone does not trigger a short term behavioural shift in incubating female common eiders Somateria mollissima, but does modify long term reproductive success /‡cFrançois Criscuolo, and 6 others.
260 ## ‡a[S.l.] :‡b[s.n.],‡c2005.
300 ## ‡ap. 306-312.
500 ## ‡aJournal of Avian Biology. Vol. 36(4) :306-312 (2005).
520 3# ‡aCorticosterone and prolactin affect reproductive success by stimulating foraging and parental behaviours, respectively. Study tested effect of corticosterone implants on reproductive success and plasma prolactin concentration in female common eiders Somateria mollissima in Prins Heinrich Island colony, Kongsfjorden, Svalbard in June 2001. Implanted females showed significant increase in corticosterone and decrease in prolactin levels. Despite enhanced daily body mass loss, females did not abandon incubation nor start to refeed in the four days following implantation. Data show experimentally induced rise in plasma corticosterone concentration alone does not trigger nest desertion. Suggests that prolactin decrease, or depletion of protein body reserves, may be factor in long-term adjustment of incubation behaviour in female eiders.
650 07 ‡a59 -- Zoology.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a591.131.1 -- Animal feeding behaviour.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a591.551 -- Animals, breeding behaviour.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a591.568 -- Care and feeding of young animals.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a598.2 -- Birds.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a598.412 -- Anseres: Somateria mollissima.‡2udc
650 07 ‡aH5 -- Zoology: birds.‡2local
651 #7 ‡a(*3) -- Arctic regions.‡2udc
651 #7 ‡a(*32) -- Svalbard.‡2udc
773 0# ‡7nnas ‡tJournal of Avian Biology. ‡gVol. 36(4) (2005) ‡wSPRI-128317
917 ## ‡aUnenhanced record from Muscat, imported 2019
948 3# ‡a20220926