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Record #164667:

Terminus behavior and response time of North Cascade glaciers, Washington, U.S.A / Mauri S. Pelto, Cliff Hedlund.

Title: Terminus behavior and response time of North Cascade glaciers, Washington, U.S.A / Mauri S. Pelto, Cliff Hedlund.
Author(s): Pelto, Mauri S.
Hedlund, Cliff.
Date: 2001.
In: Journal of Glaciology. (2001.), Vol. 47(158) (2001)
Abstract: Examines responses of 38 North Cascade glaciers to climate change and relates their disparate terminus behaviour over the last century to glacier geographic characteristics. Defines a lag time, Ts, between significant climate change and initial observed terminus response and a response time, Tm, the time taken to approach a new steady state. Believes retreat in response to post-Little Ice Age warming minor before 1890. Identifies three subsequent climatic periods in Pacific Northwest: one of temperature rise from 1880s to 1940s (this saw ubiquitous terminus retreat), one in which conditions became cooler and precipitation increased from 1944 to 1976, and a final step change in 1977 to a drier, warmer climate. Identifies three glacier responses, differing mainly following the 1944 change when Type 1 glaciers advanced, Type 2 were in slow retreat or equilibrium and Type 3 continued to retreat significantly. Within a few years of 1977 all glaciers were again retreating (two have now disappeared). Attributes different behaviours to variations in Ts (range 4 to 16 years) and Tm (ranges 20-30, 40-60 and 60-100 years for Types 1, 2 and 3, respectively). Relates these to, e.g., slope, thickness, length and mass-balance, and compares them with theoretical estimates. Concludes that initial response to climate change may be rapid, but that full adjustment is not.
Notes:

Journal of Glaciology. Vol. 47(158) :497-506 (2001).

Keywords: 551.32 -- Glaciology.
551.324 -- Land ice.
551.324.6 -- Land ice, fluctuation.
551.583.2 -- Climatic changes, historic: Little Ice Age.
E5 -- Glaciology: land ice.
(73) -- United States.
(79) -- Pacific states.
(237.1) -- Rockies and other mountains of western North America.
SPRI record no.: 164667

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520 3# ‡aExamines responses of 38 North Cascade glaciers to climate change and relates their disparate terminus behaviour over the last century to glacier geographic characteristics. Defines a lag time, Ts, between significant climate change and initial observed terminus response and a response time, Tm, the time taken to approach a new steady state. Believes retreat in response to post-Little Ice Age warming minor before 1890. Identifies three subsequent climatic periods in Pacific Northwest: one of temperature rise from 1880s to 1940s (this saw ubiquitous terminus retreat), one in which conditions became cooler and precipitation increased from 1944 to 1976, and a final step change in 1977 to a drier, warmer climate. Identifies three glacier responses, differing mainly following the 1944 change when Type 1 glaciers advanced, Type 2 were in slow retreat or equilibrium and Type 3 continued to retreat significantly. Within a few years of 1977 all glaciers were again retreating (two have now disappeared). Attributes different behaviours to variations in Ts (range 4 to 16 years) and Tm (ranges 20-30, 40-60 and 60-100 years for Types 1, 2 and 3, respectively). Relates these to, e.g., slope, thickness, length and mass-balance, and compares them with theoretical estimates. Concludes that initial response to climate change may be rapid, but that full adjustment is not.
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650 07 ‡a551.324 -- Land ice.‡2udc
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