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Record #140222:

Plankton dynamics and sedimentation / Thomas T. Noji, Francisco Rey, Lisa Miller, K. Yngve Borsheim, Hans-Jurgen Hirche, Juanita Urban-Rich.

Title: Plankton dynamics and sedimentation / Thomas T. Noji, Francisco Rey, Lisa Miller, K. Yngve Borsheim, Hans-Jurgen Hirche, Juanita Urban-Rich.
Author(s): Noji, Thomas T.
Rey, Francisco.
Miller, Lisa.
Yngve Borsheim, K.
Hirche, Hans-Jurgen.
Urban-Rich, Juanita.
Date: 1996.
Publisher: Cambridge: Sea Ice Group, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge
In: ESOP. European Subpolar Ocean Programme. Sea ice - ocean interactions. Volume 2. (1996.),
Abstract: Estimates the role of biology in the vertical flux of carbon in the central Greenland Sea from 1993 to 1995. The annual phytoplankton bloom began in May and reached peak proportions in June. In June 1994, the initiation of the bloom was in the central Greenland Sea, and the patchy distribution of prymnesiophytes and diatoms appeared to be regulated by silicate. By August, the surface was depleted of nitrate, and chlorophyll-a concentrations were significantly reduced relative to bloom levels. Thus, the phytoplankton bloom peaked and senesced before August. The growth of zooplankton stocks appeared to respond quickly to available phytoplanktonic food supply, a pattern which also was shown by bacterial biomass. The annual vertical flux of particulate organic carbon was measured with sediment traps. Sedimentation of the spring phytoplankton bloom commenced in June and rates decreased rapidly with depth, indicating that a major part of the spring phytoplankton biomass is consumed, oxidised and regenerated by the food web during its descent. In the autumn, an allochthonous source dominated sinking particles in the central Greenland gyre resulting in an annual peak in sedimentation at all depths. Suggests that the biological carbon pump in the Greenland Sea is regulated strongly by production and subsequent downwelling of dissolved organic carbon, sedimentation of particle-bound carbon in dissolved and particulate forms, as well as respiration of overwintering zooplankton stocks.
Notes:

In: ESOP. European Subpolar Ocean Programme. Sea ice - ocean interactions. Volume 2 / Peter Wadhams, Jeremy P. Wilkinson, Stephen C.S. Wells, eds.

Keywords: 551.46 -- Oceanography, physical.
551.462.54 -- Ocean troughs, trenches and deeps.
574.5 -- Marine and freshwater ecology.
001.89 -- Research programmes: European Subpolar Ocean Programme.
C -- Oceanography, hydrography and hydrology.
(*617) -- Greenland Sea and Fram Strait.
SPRI record no.: 140222

MARCXML

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035 ## ‡aSPRI-140222
040 ## ‡aUkCU-P‡beng‡eaacr
245 00 ‡aPlankton dynamics and sedimentation /‡cThomas T. Noji, Francisco Rey, Lisa Miller, K. Yngve Borsheim, Hans-Jurgen Hirche, Juanita Urban-Rich.
260 ## ‡aCambridge :‡bSea Ice Group, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge,‡c1996.
300 ## ‡ap. 540-554.
500 ## ‡aIn: ESOP. European Subpolar Ocean Programme. Sea ice - ocean interactions. Volume 2 / Peter Wadhams, Jeremy P. Wilkinson, Stephen C.S. Wells, eds.
520 3# ‡aEstimates the role of biology in the vertical flux of carbon in the central Greenland Sea from 1993 to 1995. The annual phytoplankton bloom began in May and reached peak proportions in June. In June 1994, the initiation of the bloom was in the central Greenland Sea, and the patchy distribution of prymnesiophytes and diatoms appeared to be regulated by silicate. By August, the surface was depleted of nitrate, and chlorophyll-a concentrations were significantly reduced relative to bloom levels. Thus, the phytoplankton bloom peaked and senesced before August. The growth of zooplankton stocks appeared to respond quickly to available phytoplanktonic food supply, a pattern which also was shown by bacterial biomass. The annual vertical flux of particulate organic carbon was measured with sediment traps. Sedimentation of the spring phytoplankton bloom commenced in June and rates decreased rapidly with depth, indicating that a major part of the spring phytoplankton biomass is consumed, oxidised and regenerated by the food web during its descent. In the autumn, an allochthonous source dominated sinking particles in the central Greenland gyre resulting in an annual peak in sedimentation at all depths. Suggests that the biological carbon pump in the Greenland Sea is regulated strongly by production and subsequent downwelling of dissolved organic carbon, sedimentation of particle-bound carbon in dissolved and particulate forms, as well as respiration of overwintering zooplankton stocks.
650 07 ‡a551.46 -- Oceanography, physical.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a551.462.54 -- Ocean troughs, trenches and deeps.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a574.5 -- Marine and freshwater ecology.‡2udc
650 07 ‡a001.89 -- Research programmes: European Subpolar Ocean Programme.‡2udc
650 07 ‡aC -- Oceanography, hydrography and hydrology.‡2local
651 #7 ‡a(*617) -- Greenland Sea and Fram Strait.‡2udc
700 1# ‡aNoji, Thomas T.
700 1# ‡aRey, Francisco.
700 1# ‡aMiller, Lisa.
700 1# ‡aYngve Borsheim, K.
700 1# ‡aHirche, Hans-Jurgen.
700 1# ‡aUrban-Rich, Juanita.
773 0# ‡7nnam ‡aPeter Wadhams, Jeremy P. Wilkinson, Stephen C.S. Wells, eds. ‡tESOP. European Subpolar Ocean Programme. Sea ice - ocean interactions. Volume 2. ‡dCambridge : Sea Ice Group, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, 1996. ‡wSPRI-139602
917 ## ‡aUnenhanced record from Muscat, imported 2019
948 3# ‡a20220928