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SPRI Public Lectures: previous lectures

SPRI Public Lectures: previous lectures

SPRI has a long history of public lectures - an archive of listings since 1996 is below.

Penguins

Return to the list of forthcoming seminars.

# Tuesday 24th May 2016, 5.30pm - Charles Moseley
LATITUDE NORTH BY Charles Moseley
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Tickets cost £6 but are FREE to the Friends. (you do still need to book) via eventbrite

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/latitude-north-a-talk-by-charles-moseley-tickets-23822291114?access=friends2016

Join the Friends of SPRI for fascinating evening with Charles Moseley, author of ‘Latitude North’. There will be an opportunity to browse the museum and buy books at the end

Charles Moseley fell in love with the Arctic lands as a boy growing up in Lancashire. He has since spent his life exploring those lands – from joining as a deck-hand on a deep sea trawler to leading an expedition sledging on Spitsbergen.

He now combines his academic career at Cambridge University with giving lectures on cruise ships visiting the Arctic and Antarctic. During the talk, Charles will share his experiences and the unique culture, literature and environment from the Viking settlements of Greenland and Vinland to the ice-bound islands of the far north.

‘Latitude North’ is his most recent book and he will be selling and signing copies of the book after the talk.

Doors open 5.30pm

# Saturday 24th October 2015, 7.30pm - Dr Gareth Rees
‘What colour is Signy Island?’
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

SPRIS very own Dr Gareth Rees spent two months on Signy Island in the Antarctic in 2014-15, measuring the colour of penguins and their guano. He will explain how and why, and what it had to do with climate change.

# Saturday 10th October 2015, 7.30pm - Bob Headland
'The Non-Existent Islands of the Antarctic'.
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

The nineteen peri-Antarctic islands of the Southern Ocean and southern extents of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans, are relatively well known but, another nineteen islands have also appeared on charts. These are all non-existent, although some have shown remarkable cartographic persistence.

This lecture will describe these islands, endeavour to account for their ‘discovery’ and subsequent fate (‘expunged from the chart’).

Non-existent islands have appeared in all oceans of the Earth – but the far south has a greater preponderance than elsewhere. Illustrations will be provided as far as is practicable.

# Saturday 14th March 2015, 7.30pm - Stephen Pax Leonard
Life on the edge: language and story telling in a cold place
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

In 2010, Leonard set off on a journey to document the language and spoken traditions of a small group of Inuit living in a remote corner of north-west Greenland. This group call themselves the Inugguit (the ‘big people’) and they speak an exceedingly complex language understood by few outsiders. The Inugguit number 700 and live in the northern most permanently inhabited place in the world, occupying four different settlements scattered across an area the size of Germany. Leonard lived with the Inugguit for 12 months, learning their language and living their way of life, not leaving the region at any point. As a teenager, Leonard had read about the Inugguit through the accounts of the explorer, Sir Wally Herbert who lived in the region in the early 1970s and who had been a motivation for his journey.

Travelling with hunters out on the Arctic sea ice, he followed in Herbert’s footsteps and discovered another world entirely, a way of life more or less unchanged for a thousand years. Living such a simple life in a pre-industrial society at the top of the world, Leonard came to understand the Inugguit’s privileged take on the busy, overpopulated world that lies beneath them. Back in the settlements, traditional life was juxtaposed with a modern, consumerist lifestyle that has now made it to every corner of the planet. Some of the Inugguit may live in tiny, wind-beaten wooden cabins with no running water, but Amazon delivers.

This lecture is a story of a year spent documenting the language and stories of a small group of Arctic hunters whose ancient way of life is now in sharp transition. Affected directly by climate change, their quiet corner of the planet is melting. Their white, Arctic universe is about to become the epicenter of a geo-political battle over the remaining finite resources left on Earth, a place where polar bear fur clad Arctic hunters and their dog teams meet precious metal prospectors with satellite based spectroscopes and hundreds of millions of dollars to spend.

# Saturday 28th February 2015, 7.30pm - Colin Summerhayes
Earth's Climate Evolution
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Ice sheets are melting. “Global warming deniers are fond of saying “the climate is always changing”. Well, yes it is, but why, and how, and how much? Studying the geological and ice core record helps us to see how variable our climate is, and what makes it so, which helps to explain what is happening now and what may happen next. The past 30 years have seen especially dramatic advances in our knowledge of past climatic variability, from studies of ice cores, along with piston cores and drill cores of marine sediment. A key emerging message is that our climate operates within a narrow natural envelope. Over the past 2000 years we have been at the cold end of the Holocene Neoglacial period, driven there by changes in Earth’s orbit. Peaks in solar output gave us the Medieval Warm Period and the warming from 1900 to 1945, but since 1960 solar output has been flat or in decline, while temperatures have gone on rising even though the orbital data tell us we should still be in the cool Neoglacial. We have been driven outside the natural climate envelope by our emissions of CO2. This geologically based information is independent of numerical climate models, yet supports them. The rock and ice records tell us that further increasing CO2 will drive up temperature and sea level.

Colin Summerhayes is a marine geochemist with expertise in determining past climates from the characteristics of marine sediments. He is an Emeritus Associate at the Scott Polar Research Institute of the University of Cambridge. Formerly he was Executive Director of the International Council for Science’s Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR), Director of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) Project at UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission in Paris, Director of the UK’s Institute of Oceanographic Sciences Deacon Laboratory (Wormley), and Deputy Director of what is now the National Oceanography Centre.

His books include “Oceanography – an Illustrated Guide”, “Oceans 2020 – Science, Trends and the Challenge of Sustainability”, “Antarctic climate Change and the Environment”, and (in press) “Earth’s Climate Evolution

# Saturday 25th October 2014, 7.30pm - Susanna Ferrar: "Stuff: what good is an Antarctic Heritage?"
Michaelmas Term Lecture
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Hartley Travers Ferrar was the geologist on the “Discovery” expedition of 1901-4, so shared their first foray into Antarctic exploration with both Scott and Shackleton. His grand-daughter Susanna Ferrar has been trying to follow the faint trail he left behind and has been exploring some interesting questions. She was fortunate enough to be accepted onto Canterbury University’s Postgraduate Certificate of Antarctic Studies course in 2011, spending 6 months in quake-ravaged Christchurch and 10 days in Antarctica, camping on the Ross Ice shelf and passing through Scott and McMurdo Bases. She is continuing to trawl the archives at SPRI when she can, rendering her grandfather’s papers into electronic form so that they will be more easily accessible in the future.

# Saturday 22nd March 2014, 7.30pm - ‘The Life and Work of MacDonald Gill: mapmaker and artist ’ by Caroline Walker, Andrew Johnston and Angela Johnston
This is a normal lecture in the lecture series - and not a special ticketed event as advertised in Polar Bytes 69.
Lent Term Lecture 2
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

When Priscilla, the daughter of calligrapher Edward Johnston, died in 1984, her nephew Andrew Johnston inherited not just her cottage, but also a treasure trove of memorabilia and artwork linked to her first husband, the graphic artist and pictorial mapmaker MacDonald Gill. This collection formed the basis of the exhibition Out of the Shadows: MacDonald Gill which took place in 2011 at the University of Brighton and 2013 at the Pitzhanger Manor Gallery in Ealing. In 2006, at the same time as the exhibition was first mooted, Caroline Walker, Max’s great-niece, who had begun to research his life, contacted Andrew. She was astounded by the quantity and quality of material – poster maps, family photos, letters, scrap books and original artwork, which revealed not just the genius of Max’s art, but also the personality and life story of the artist himself. Years of reading and photographing ensued! Andrew’s wife Angela then undertook the mammoth task of organising and documenting this mountain of material. Meanwhile, she also became fascinated in the love story of Max and Priscilla, which is vividly described in the journals Priscilla kept throughout her life.

This talk will reflect the differing interests of the three speakers. Andrew will discuss how Max’s works, especially his pictorial maps, document the world in which he lived, from the Edwardian era to the Second World War. Caroline will focus on Max’s life, influences and career, with special mention of his work at the SPRI, while Angela will talk about the relationship between Max and Priscilla Johnston.

# Saturday 22nd February 2014, 7.30pm - Submarines in the Arctic: four decades of pack ice and the Royal Navy by Dr Charles Swithinbank, Prof Peter Wadhams and Dr Nick Hughes
Lent Term Lecture 1
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Abstract not available

# Saturday 23rd November 2013, 7.30pm - British Antarctic Survey Aviation by Rod Arnold
Michaelmas Term Lecture 4
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road
# Saturday 9th November 2013, 4.00pm - Special lecture for AGM Day
Michaelmas Term Lecture 3
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Lecture 3 is part of the Friends’ AGM Day.

Please see the Friends’ Events Page and Polar Bytes for further information.

# Saturday 26th October 2013, 7.30pm - Operation Tabarin by John Dudeney
Michaelmas Term Lecture 2
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road
# Saturday 12th October 2013, 7.30pm - Exotic terrestrial mammals in Antarctic regions by Bob Headland
Michaelmas Term Lecture 1
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Joint event with the South Georgia Association.

# Saturday 23rd March 2013, 7.30pm - 'DROMLAN: a travelogue, A personal experience of the Dronning Maud Land Air Network (DROMLAN) in the austral spring of 2004' by Peter Clarkson.
Lent Term Lecture 4
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Peter Clarkson is an Emeritus Associate of the Institute. He currently assists with the Institute’s education and outreach activities, particularly in relation to the centenary of Captain Scott’s attainment of the South Pole, by giving talks and lectures to various school and adult groups.

# Saturday 9th March 2013, 7.30pm - 'Discovering Bellingshausen' by Rip Bulkeley
Lent Term Lecture 3
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Rip Bulkeley is an independent historian of the earth sciences who lives in Oxford. He speaks, or at least reads, several languages including Russian. Since taking degrees in Peace Studies and Strategic Studies in the 1980s his main interest has been in the interaction between international relations and international scientific cooperation. His research into the International Geophysical Year of 1957—58 led him to develop an interest in the history of Antarctica and the (exaggerated) claim that scientific cooperation laid the basis for the Antarctic Treaty. While working in that field he came across the Russian Antarctic expedition of 1819—21, which was only the second voyage in history to cross the Antarctic Circle, 47 years after James Cook. What he found next will be the subject of this short talk about his research project.

# Saturday 23rd February 2013, 7.30pm - 'The Sirius Dog Sledge Patrol' by Lieutenant Commander John S Ash
Lent Term Lecture 2
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

In the 21st Century, a vast area of the Arctic is still protected by a naval dog sledge patrol. Rejecting more modern transport, the Patrol employs traditional methods and undergoes some of the most testing conditions imaginable to guard the resources of the largest island on the planet. This lecture describes the origins of the Patrol in a 20th Century weather war and how it operates today; examining the life of a modern military dog in the Arctic, and explaining why the Patrol has never abandoned its sledges for a more mechanically sophisticated alternative.

# Saturday 9th February 2013, 7.30pm - 'Empire Antarctica: Ice, Silence & Emperor Penguins' by Gavin Francis
Lent Term Lecture 1
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Gavin Francis is the author of ‘Empire Antarctica’, a book published by Chatto & Windus this year which describes his 14 months as base doctor at Halley, a British Antarctic Survey station on the Caird Coast at 75 deg South. The base is the most remote operated by the British, and has been continuously occupied since it was set up for the International Geophysical Year in 1956.
It is also beside one of the continent’s largest colonies of emperor penguins. Join us for an illustrated talk as Gavin takes us through the seasons at Halley, visits aspects of the ‘Heroic Age’ of Antarctic Exploration, and what lessons it still has to teach BAS staff today about overwintering. He will also describe a year in the life of the emperors which, as Gavin writes, ‘through the months of cold and isolation reminded me that I was part of a community of the living.’

# Saturday 24th November 2012, 7.30pm - By Wind Power Across Antarctica by Ramon Larramendi
Doors open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start
Michaelmas Term Lecture 4
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road
# Saturday 10th November 2012, 3.30pm - Frozen Planet - the making of the TV Series by Vanessa Berlowitz
Doors open at 3pm for a 3:30pm start - note this is an afternoon talk and will finish at approx. 5pm
Michaelmas Term Lecture 3
Venue: Bristol-Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre at the Department of Chemistry (off the SPRI car park)

Vanessa Berlowitz was the Series Producer for the BBC series ‘Frozen Planet’.

This special lecture costs £15 (£10 for Friends of SPRI)

# Saturday 27th October 2012, 7.30pm - Henry 'Birdie' Bowers - Captain Scott's Marvel by Anne Strathie
Doors open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start
Michaelmas Term Lecture 2
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road
Anne Strathie will speak on her new biography of Henry ‘Birdie’ Bowers
# Saturday 13th October 2012, 7.30pm - The Third Reich in Antarctica – the story of the Third German Antarctic Expedition of 1938-39 by Colin Summerhayes
Doors open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start
Michael Term Lecture 1
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road
# Saturday 14th July 2012, 12.30pm - In the spirit of Scott. by Lt. Col. Edwards
For lunch attendees only - pre-booking required
Summer Lunch Talk
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

A talk by the leader of the British Services Antarctic Expedition 2012.

See your latest Polar Bytes to book a place

# Saturday 17th March 2012, 7.30pm - Robert Burton
Lent Term Lecture 4
Shackleton’s month at South Georgia
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

7:30pm for 8pm

# Saturday 10th March 2012, 6.45pm - David Baillie
Lent Term Lecture 3
Title to be confirmed
Venue: Trinity House, London

Lecture 3 will take place at the Scott Centenary Dinner. Please see the Friends’ Events page for further information.

# Saturday 25th February 2012, 5.30pm - Gareth Rees
Please note the earlier start time. Lent Term Lecture 2
How vulnerable is reindeer herding in the European Arctic?
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

5:30pm for 6pm

# Saturday 11th February 2012, 7.30pm - Dr Lewis Halsey
Lent Term Lecture 1
The physiology of man-hauling in the Antarctic: could Scott have survived?
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

7:30pm for 8pm

# Tuesday 6th December 2011, 7.00pm - Dr Peter Donaldson
Please note earlier start time. Doors open at 18:30. A chance to preview the These Rough Notes exhibition.
Sir Joseph Hooker and the Ross Antarctic Expedition
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Michaelmas Term Lecture 4

Sir Joseph Hooker, in many ways the forgotten man in the story of Evolution, was a great scientist, plant collector and explorer. He wrote the Floras of the Antarctic, New Zealand, India and Tasmania with a major introduction to the Flora of Australia. This talk will mainly focus on his participation as Assistant Surgeon and Botanist on board the Erebus, one of two ships on the Ross Antarctic Expedition.

The speaker, Dr Peter Donaldson, has for the past three years been making a major documentary on the life and travels of this great Victorian scientist. Filming has been completed in the Himalayas, the subantarctic Auckland and Campbell islands, Morocco, the UK, New Zealand and Australia.

The talk will chart the gradual development of Hooker’s ideas of Southern Hemisphere plants having evolved from an ancient Antarctic landmass. This was many years before the discovery of continental drift and Gondwanaland.

Peter will also show some of Hooker’s original sketches and type specimens from the Herbarium of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew and Hooker’ first sketch of Mount Everest which Peter located during his research in the archives at Kew.

# Saturday 26th November 2011, 8.00pm - Melanie Challenger
On Extinction: Natural and unnatural disappearances from the old whaling stations of Antarctica to the Inuit camps of the Arctic
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Michaelmas Term Lecture 3

From our destruction of the natural world to the human cultures that are rapidly dying out, Melanie Challenger’s forthcoming book ‘On Extinction’ is an exploration of these disappearances and why they should concern us. Challenger asks questions about how we’ve become destructive to our environment, our emotional responses to extinctions, and how these responses might shape our future relationship with nature.
The book narrates her travels to the abandoned whaling stations of South Georgia, the melting icescape of Antarctica, and the Inuit camps of the Arctic, where she traces the links between human activities and environmental collapse.

Melanie Challenger was International Fellow at the British Antarctic Survey for International Polar Year 2007–8 and studied the Inuit community of Pangnirtung under a British Council Darwin Award. ‘On Extinction’ is published in the UK by Granta Books in October 2011.

# Saturday 29th October 2011, 10.15am - Various Speakers
Amundsen and Scott: Lives Explored
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

An all day event in place of Michaelmas Term Lecture 2.

See the Museum Events page for further information and how to book

# Saturday 15th October 2011, 8.00pm - Angie Butler (Author)
Angie Butler: The Quest for Frank Wild
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Michaelmas Term Lecture 1

Angie has recently published a book “The Quest for Frank Wild”.

Quest for Frank Wild website

# Saturday 26th March 2011, 8.00pm - Dr Jonathan L. Watkins, BAS
Variation and change in the Southern Ocean eco-system
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Abstract not available

# Saturday 12th March 2011, 8.00pm - Bryan Lintott, SPRI
The British Graham Land Expedition, 1934-37
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Abstract not available

# Saturday 26th February 2011, 8.00pm - Dr Mike Sparrow - SCAR
Antarctic Science and Policy Advice in a Changing World
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Abstract not available

# Thursday 17th February 2011, 8.00pm - Bryan Lintott - SPRI
The British Graham Land Expedition, 1934-37
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Abstract not available

# Saturday 12th February 2011, 8.00pm - Professor John Turner - BAS
Recent Antarctic Climate Change
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Abstract not available

# Saturday 20th November 2010, 8.00pm - Robin Back, Chairman, Friends of Scott Polar Research Institute
Doors open 7:30PM
The Northern Party – in the shadows of the heroic age?
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Originally named the Eastern party, a small group of seamen under the command of Lt. Victor Campbell with one scientist, Geologist Raymond Priestley, intended to land and explore King Edward VII land to the East of the Ross ice barrier in 1911. Things turned out somewhat differently… Faced with disaster and starvation, the party overwintered in an ice cave ‘living off the land’ but all survived in an extraordinary tale of courage and endurance.

# Saturday 13th November 2010, 4.00pm - Bryony Dixon, Curator Silent Film, British Film Institute
Unique first preview of the digitally remastered, official record of Scott's Terra Nova expedition 1910-13
The Great White Silence
Venue: BMS Lecture Theatre, School of Chemistry, Lensfield Road

A brief discussion of the techniques followed by a viewing of Herbert Ponting’s Official record of Captain Scott’s heroic journey to the South Pole. Digitally remastered by British Film Institute experts, Ponting’s original instructions including tinting of his original film stock before release are described by Bryony Dixon, Silent Film Curator at BFI. Tickets are £10.00 each available from Friends of SPRI, Lensfield Rd. Cambridge CB2 1ER tel:01223 336540

# Saturday 30th October 2010, 8.00pm - Dr. Colin Summerhayes, a marine geologist, is a past Director of the UK's Institute of Oceanographic Sciences Deacon Laboratory and a former Deputy Director of the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.
Doors open 7:30PM
Melting ice - rising seas: Antarctic Climate Change and the Environment
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Despite global warming, the ozone hole is keeping Antarctica colder than it would be otherwise and making sea ice grow. The Antarctic Peninsula is warming, affecting penguins; East Antarctica, however, is still cold. Warm ocean currents reach the continental shelf off West Antarctica, melting glaciers from beneath and making them speed up. Antarctica and Greenland are now both losing land ice, making sea level rise faster than expected. In future the continent will warm more, land ice will melt, sea ice will shrink, and penguin productivity will drop. There are significant implications for coastal communities in the impending sea-level rise.

# Saturday 16th October 2010, 8.00pm - Jim McNeill, Explorer and Adventure Travel organiser
Doors open 7:30PM
“Sir Hubert Wilkins – Forgotten Hero?”
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Highly accomplished explorer, award winning cinematographer, record breaking sub-mariner and pioneering aviator, Australian born Sir Hubert Wilkins was a true hero of his time with ticker tape parades in New York and global news coverage celebrating his amazing acts of derring-do and serious exploration. Why is it then that few, today, have heard of him and even fewer know of the length and breadth of his exploits? Jim McNeill presents a thought provoking potted history and relates it to modern-day exploration.

# Saturday 20th March 2010, 8.00pm - Robert Headland, Scott Polar Research Institute and South Georgia Association
Free lecture in conjunction with South Georgia Association
The South Sandwich Islands
Venue: Pfizer Lecture Theatre, School of Chemistry, Lensfield Road, Cambridge

The South Sandwich Islands are one of the remotest chains of eleven volcanic islands, (one of which recently erupted). From their discovery in 1775 by Captain Cook to current events, this lecture will cover their geography, history, volcanology and biology, and include James Cook, Bellingshausen, Larsen, whaling, ‘Discovery’, Argentines, BAS and politics in 1982.

# Saturday 6th March 2010, 8.00pm - Fiona Cahill BA(Hons)
Free Lecture
Extreme conservation - living and working in Antarctica
Venue: Pfizer Lecture Theatre, School of Chemistry, Lensfield Road, Cambridge

The conservation of objects from Shackleton’s Hut at Cape Royds, over-wintering in Antarctica and the conservation work being carried out at SPRI for the new museum displays.

# Saturday 20th February 2010, 8.00pm - Paul Goldstein
For non-members of the Friends of Scott Polar Research Institute, there is an entry fee of £5 payable at the door.
Penguins to Polar Bears
Venue: Wolfson Lecture Theatre, School of Chemistry, Lensfield Road, Cambridge

An illustrated lecture on polar fauna by a master of wildlife photography in the polar regions.

# Saturday 6th February 2010, 8.00pm - Isobel Williams, Doctor and Biographer
Free Lecture
With Scott in the Antarctic, Edward Wilson - Explorer, Naturalist, Artist
Venue: Pfizer Lecture Theatre, School of Chemistry, Lensfield Road, Cambridge

Abstract not available

# Saturday 28th November 2009, 8.00pm - Dr. David Wilson
Copies of Dr.Wilson's book for sale at this event. Doors open 19:30:
"Nimrod Illustrated: Pictures from Lieutenant Shackleton's British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909"
Venue: Pfizer Lecture Theatre, School of Chemistry, Lensfield Road, Cambridge

A lecture to mark the centenary of one of the most celebrated expeditions of the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration, that of Ernest Shackleton’s ‘Nimrod’ expedition. This reached within 100 geographical miles of the South Pole, conquered the South Magnetic Pole and made the first ascent of Mount Erebus, earning Shackleton his knighthood.

# Saturday 25th November 2006, 8.00pm - Professor Elizabeth Morris
Warnings from the Inland Ice
Venue: SPRI Lecture Theatre, Lensfield Road

Professor Morris is one of the most senior British glaciologists and has worked on problems of climate change both in the Antarctic and in the Arctic. After working for the British Antarctic Survey as Head of the Ice and Climate Division and as the NERC Arctic Science Advisor she has recently become a Senior Associate of SPRI. She was appointed OBE in the Millennium Honours List for services to Polar Science. Tonight she will talk about her fieldwork on the Greenland Ice Sheet and how the ice sheet is responding to rapid climate change.

# Saturday 11th November 2006, 5.00pm - Ranulph Fiennes
Tickets £12.50, available in advance from the Scott Polar Research Institute, Lensfield Road
Living Dangerously: My Life as an Explorer
Venue: BMS Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry

Since 1969 Sir Ranulph Fiennes has led numerous expeditions. Described as the “World’s Greatest Living Explorer”, his exploits have pushed the limits of human knowledge and endurance. In the process he has achieved some legendary polar records. In 1993 he was appointed OBE for ‘human endeavour and charitable services’; and in 1995 a second clasp to his Polar Medal in recognition of his outstanding accomplishments in polar exploration. Sir Ranulph is also a renowned author and speaker.
This is a fund-raising lecture for the Diamond Jubilee of the Scott Polar Research Institute’s Friends. Tickets £12.50 are available from the Institute.

Earlier listings